Basement Waterproofing Columbus, IN

Basement Waterproofing Columbus, IN

Basement Waterproofing Columbus

 

Basement Waterproofing and Foundation Repair

If you are noticing water seepage, your foundation is at an advanced stage and serious future problems could occur like bowing and buckling of the foundation walls and floor. You may begin to notice mold, mildew, musty orders, bugs and insects or even mud after a heavy rain. In addition, You may have noticed some mold or mildew forming on the walls. Mold occurs due to a moist, damp environment. Mold and mildew cause such problems as allergies, headaches, sinuses and other health issues. You may also be noticing dry rot on the walls, baseboards, joists, floor and bottom of a wood staircase. This is due to moisture coming through your walls and floor. This type of fungus is also a major health concern. We are updated on everything from installation techniques, to customer service improvements. You benefit in the knowledge that these third party inspection agencies require us to meet stringent requirements to remain members in good standing. Everdry Indiana is proud to be the premier basement waterproofing, foundation repair and crawl space waterproofing company in Indianapolis. Our services are permanent which is why we offer a Lifetime guarantee on most of our services. Everdry Indiana is an expert basement waterproofing company that can help you with basement leaks and flooding with our waterproofing services. We are happy to say we’ve helped many families repair their foundations and take back basements so they can enjoy their homes for a long time to come. Give us a call today so we can start helping you!

Facts About Columbus

The land developed as Columbus was bought by General John Tipton and Luke Bonesteel in 1820. Tipton built a log cabin on Mount Tipton, a small hill overlooking White River and the surrounding flat, heavily forested and swampy valley. It held the wetlands of the river. The town was first known as Tiptonia, named in honor of Tipton. The town’s name was changed to Columbus on March 20, 1821. General Tipton was upset by the name change and decided to leave the newly founded town. He later was appointed as the highway commissioner for the State of Indiana and was assigned to building a highway from Indianapolis, Indiana to Louisville, Kentucky. When the road reached Columbus, Tipton constructed the first bypass road ever built; it detoured south around the west side of Columbus en route to Seymour. Joseph McKinney was the first to plot the town of Columbus, but no date was recorded.

Local history books for years said that the land on which Columbus sits was donated by General Tipton. But in 2003, Historic Columbus Indiana acquired a deed showing that General Tipton sold the land. A ferry was established below the confluence of the Flatrock and Driftwood rivers, which form the White River. A village of three or four log cabins developed around the ferry landing, and a store was added in 1821. Later that year, Bartholomew County was organized by an act of the State Legislature and named to honor the famous Hoosier militiaman, General Joseph Bartholomew. Columbus was incorporated on June 28, 1864. The first railroad in Indiana was constructed to Columbus from Madison, Indiana in 1844. This eventually became the Madison branch of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The railroad fostered the growth of the community into one of the largest in Indiana, and three more railroads reached the city by 1850.

Columbus is host to the oldest theater in Indiana, The Crump Theatre, which was built in 1889 by John Crump. Today the building is included within the Columbus Historic District. Before it closed permanently in 2010, it was an all-ages venue with occasional musical performances. Columbus was host to the oldest continually operated bookstore in Indiana, Cummins Bookstore, which began operations in 1892. It closed in late 2007. The Irwin Union Bank building was built in 1954. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service in 2001 in recognition of its unique architecture. The building consists of a one-story bank structure adjacent to a three-story office annex. A portion of the office annex was built along with the banking hall in 1954. The remaining larger portion, designed by Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates, was built in 1973. Eero Saarinen designed the bank building with its glazed hall to be set off against the blank background of its three-story brick annex. Two steel and glass vestibule connectors lead from the north side of this structure to the annex. The building was designed to distance the Irwin Union Bank from traditional banking architecture, which mostly echoed imposing, neoclassical style buildings of brick or stone.

Columbus has been home to many manufacturing companies, including Noblitt-Sparks Industries (which built radios under the Arvin brand in the 1930s) and Arvin Industries, now Meritor, Inc. After merging with Meritor Automotive on July 10, 2000, the headquarters of the newly created ArvinMeritor Industries was established in Troy, Michigan, the home of parent company, Rockwell International. It was announced in February 2011 that the company name would revert to Meritor, Inc. Cummins, Inc. is by far the region’s largest employer, and the Infotech Park accounts for a sizable number of research jobs in Columbus proper. Just south of Columbus are the North American headquarters of Toyota Material Handling, U.S.A., Inc., the world’s largest material handling (forklift) manufacturer. Other notable industries include architecture, a discipline for which Columbus is famous worldwide. The late J. Irwin Miller (then president and chairman of Cummins Engine Company) launched the Cummins Foundation, a charitable program that helps subsidize a large number of architectural projects throughout the city by up-and-coming engineers and architects. Early in the 20th century, Columbus also was home to a number of pioneering car manufacturers, including Reeves, which produced the unusual four-axle Octoauto and the twin rear-axle Sextoauto, both around 1911.

Nearly 19,000 workers commute into the city from the surrounding townships and villages. In recent years city officials have explored ways to revitalize the city. They recognize the value of J. Irwin Miller’s support of architectural excellence in the mid-20th century, when the Cummins Foundation made it a mecca of modern architecture. Economic development, widespread beautification innovations, various tax incentives, and increased law enforcement have helped Columbus overcome what some considered a slump during the 1980s and 1990s. In addition to the Columbus Historic District and Irwin Union Bank, the city has numerous buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places, including seven National Historic Landmarks of modernist architecture: Bartholomew County Courthouse, Columbus City Hall, First Baptist Church, First Christian Church, Haw Creek Leather Company, Mabel McDowell Elementary School, McEwen-Samuels-Marr House, McKinley School, Miller House, North Christian Church, and The Republic.

WHERE TO FIND US
805 S. Girls School Road
Indianapolis, IN 46231
Phone: 317-668-4114