Foundation Repair Anderson, IN

Foundation Repair Anderson, IN

Foundation Repair AndersonBasement Waterproofing and Foundation Repair
If you are noticing water seepage, your foundation is at an advanced stage and serious future problems could occur like bowing and buckling of the foundation walls and floor. You may begin to notice mold, mildew, musty orders, bugs and insects or even mud after a heavy rain. In addition, You may have noticed some mold or mildew forming on the walls. Mold occurs due to a moist, damp environment. Mold and mildew cause such problems as allergies, headaches, sinuses and other health issues. You may also be noticing dry rot on the walls, baseboards, joists, floor and bottom of a wood staircase. This is due to moisture coming through your walls and floor. This type of fungus is also a major health concern. We are updated on everything from installation techniques, to customer service improvements. You benefit in the knowledge that these third party inspection agencies require us to meet stringent requirements to remain members in good standing. Everdry Indiana is proud to be the premier basement waterproofing, foundation repair and crawl space waterproofing company in Indianapolis. Our services are permanent which is why we offer a Lifetime guarantee on most of our services. Everdry Indiana is an expert basement waterproofing company that can help you with basement leaks and flooding with our waterproofing services. We are happy to say we’ve helped many families repair their foundations and take back basements so they can enjoy their homes for a long time to come. Give us a call today so we can start helping you!

Facts About Anderson 

Prior to the organization of Madison County, William Conner entered the land upon which Anderson is located. Conner later sold the ground to John and Sarah Berry, who donated 32 acres (129,000 m²) of their land to Madison County on the condition that the county seat be moved from Pendleton to Anderson. John Berry laid out the first plat of Anderson on November 7, 1827. In 1828 the seat of justice was moved from Pendleton to Anderson. The city is named for Chief William “Adam” Anderson, whose mother was a Delaware Indian and whose father was of Swedish descent. Chief Anderson’s Indian name was Kikthawenund meaning “creaking boughs”. The Delaware village was known as Anderson’s Town, though the Moravian Missionaries called it “The Heathen Town Four Miles Away.” Anderson was also known as Andersonton before being formally organized as Anderson.

Introduction of internal improvements by the Mammoth Internal Improvement Act caused a growth in the population in 1837. In December, 1838, Anderson was incorporated as a town with 350 inhabitants. The Central Canal, a branch of the Wabash and Erie Canal, was planned to come through Anderson. Work continued on the canal during 1838 and the beginning of 1839, but work on the canal was soon suspended by the state following the Panic of 1837. The town again became a sleepy village until 1849 when it was incorporated a second time as a town. Many new commercial ventures located around the Courthouse Square.This incorporation was short-lived and Anderson once again went back to village status in 1852. However, with the completion of the Indianapolis Bellefontaine Railroad, as well as their station in 1852, Anderson burst to life. The third incorporation of Anderson as a town occurred on June 9, 1853. The population continued to increase. On August 28, 1865, with a population was nearly 1,300 people, Anderson was incorporated as a city.

Between 1853 and the late 19th century, twenty industries of various sizes located there. On March 31, 1887, natural gas was discovered in Anderson. As the Indiana Gas Boom began, this discovery led new businesses that could use natural gas, such as glass-making, to move to the city. Anderson grew to such proportions that a Cincinnati newspaper editor labeled the city “The Pittsburgh on White River.” Other appellations were “Queen City of the Gas Belt” and (because of the vulcanizing and the rubber tire manufacturing business) “Puncture Proof City.”In 1897 the Interurban Railroad was born in Anderson. Charles Henry, a large stockholder, coined the term “Interurban” in 1893. It continued to operate until 1941. The year 1912 spelled disaster for Anderson: the natural gas ran out, due to the residents squandering their resources. The city left its gas-powered lights on day and night, and there are stories of a pocket of natural gas being lit in the river and burning for a prolonged period for the spectacle of it. The result of the loss of natural gas was that several factories moved out. The whole city slowed down. The Commercial Club (formed on November 18, 1905) was the forerunner of the present chamber of commerce.

Over the years, 17 different types of automobiles were manufactured in Anderson with the Lambert family among the city’s leaders in its development and Buckeye Gasoline Buggy the Lambert product. Many other inventions were perfected in Anderson including: the gas regulator (Miron G. Reynolds), the stamp vending machine (Frank P. Dunn), clothes presser (H. Donald Forse), “Irish Mail” handcars (Hugh Hill), flower car for funeral homes (Francis M. McClain, automatic gearshift (Von D. Polhemus), Sisson choke (Glenn Sisson), and the vulcanizing process to retread tires (Charles E. Miller). Like most other industrial cities in Indiana and the Rust Belt as a whole, Anderson suffered tremendously from deindustrialization in the 1970s and 1980s.

WHERE TO FIND US
805 S. Girls School Road
Indianapolis, IN 46231
Phone: 317-668-4114